Below Sea Level

Explore Your World with Smaller Earth
Currently a college freshman aspiring to be a Marine Biologist. I enjoy all aspects of the ocean, recreational and scientific and I'm doing the best I can to enjoy them while stuck in oceanless Ohio. Feel free to recommend your favorite ocean/Marine Bio blogs or to submit pictures of sea creatures, etc. :)

(Source: vanianka, via eduardo-)

scienceyoucanlove:

The squat lobster (Galathea pilosa), is a very rare species found in the shallow waters of French Polynesia. It is unique in its bright colouring, but its flattened body with the tail curled under the thorax is typical for its genus.Image: Moorea Biocode
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scienceyoucanlove:

The squat lobster (Galathea pilosa), is a very rare species found in the shallow waters of French Polynesia. It is unique in its bright colouring, but its flattened body with the tail curled under the thorax is typical for its genus.

Image: Moorea Biocode

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(via marine-science)

kqedscience:

How Seahorses Survive With Squishable Armor
“Crabs, birds, and manta rays regularly try to crush sea horses for dinner, but a sea horse has some unusual protective armor. Its tail can be compressed to half its normal size without lasting damage, researchers at the University of California, San Diego, recently found. The tail’s resilience comes from its structure: approximately 36 square segments, each made of four bony plates. The plates connect to the spinal column’s vertebrae with collagen and can glide past one another, keeping the spine safe. Ultimately, the researchers would like to build a robotic arm out of 3-D–printed plates that mimic the seahorse’s flexible and tough tail and use it for underwater excursions or to detonate bombs.”

kqedscience:

How Seahorses Survive With Squishable Armor

Crabs, birds, and manta rays regularly try to crush sea horses for dinner, but a sea horse has some unusual protective armor. Its tail can be compressed to half its normal size without lasting damage, researchers at the University of California, San Diego, recently found. The tail’s resilience comes from its structure: approximately 36 square segments, each made of four bony plates. The plates connect to the spinal column’s vertebrae with collagen and can glide past one another, keeping the spine safe. Ultimately, the researchers would like to build a robotic arm out of 3-D–printed plates that mimic the seahorse’s flexible and tough tail and use it for underwater excursions or to detonate bombs.”

(via mad-as-a-marine-biologist)

(Source: crispyfishsticks, via eduardo-)

griseus:

NEW SHARK SPECIES DISCOVERED!!
Sammy Fretwell
Scientists have discovered a new species of shark in the ocean off South Carolina and have named it for the region where it was found.
The “Carolina hammerhead,” thought to reach 11 feet long and weigh about 400 pounds, has been identified cruising the waters at Bull’s Bay north of Charleston, St. Helena Sound near Beaufort and in the Charleston harbor. But biologists suspect these hammerheads occur worldwide, since evidence of them has been found in the past from Brazil to the Indian Ocean. The number of Carolina hammerheads is thought to be small.
more HeraldOnline
Photo: NOAA Fisheries

griseus:

NEW SHARK SPECIES DISCOVERED!!

Sammy Fretwell

Scientists have discovered a new species of shark in the ocean off South Carolina and have named it for the region where it was found.

The “Carolina hammerhead,” thought to reach 11 feet long and weigh about 400 pounds, has been identified cruising the waters at Bull’s Bay north of Charleston, St. Helena Sound near Beaufort and in the Charleston harbor. But biologists suspect these hammerheads occur worldwide, since evidence of them has been found in the past from Brazil to the Indian Ocean. The number of Carolina hammerheads is thought to be small.

(via eduardo-)

(Source: heimas, via eduardo-)

marine-science:

Fishing Net Victim by NOAA’s National Ocean Service on Flickr.
A sea turtle, killed by fishing net in Bay of Bengal, India. Credit: Sourav Mahmud

marine-science:

Fishing Net Victim by NOAA’s National Ocean Service on Flickr.

A sea turtle, killed by fishing net in Bay of Bengal, India.

Credit: Sourav Mahmud